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Parasite Movie Review: Social Satire that Captures the Attention of the Audience

It’s best to go into South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s critically acclaimed box office smash with as little background knowledge as possible. It might be easier to stop and go directly to the theatre if you’re reading this before watching the movie and you’ve managed to avoid the media frenzy this has got ever since it won the Palme d’Or because the Korean movie Parasite is, at the risk of adding to the hype, the extraordinary experience that makes going to the movies today a pleasure. We watched it for the fourth time last week, and now we can’t wait to see it in black and white as Bong did recently at the Rotterdam Film Festival.

Parasite Movie: Synopsis

Parasite‘ is a wonderfully made movie that is unquestionably a must-see, with an intelligent and piercing investigation of human behavior. The Oscar-winning Korean film Parasite is finally online on Amazon Prime Video.

Parasite Movie: Plot and Cast

A story of two families from opposite ends of the socioeconomic spectrum told with the trademark genre-fluidity that has seen Bong’s back catalog slip seamlessly from murder mystery, via monster movie, to dystopian future-fantasy and beyond, is told in Parasite, which according to its creator is “a comedy without clowns, a tragedy without villains.” The Kim family, led by father Ki-taek (Song Kang-ho) and mother Chung-sook (Chang Hyae-jin), is introduced to us in their modest semi-basement home while searching for stray WiFi and keeping their windows open to take advantage of the street’s bug-killing fumigation. They have each other and a common sense of entrepreneurial grit.

As a result, when son Ki-woo (Choi Woo-Shik) is presented with the chance to educate a wealthy schoolgirl at home, he convinces his talented artist sister Ki-Jung (Park So-dam) to fake a college diploma. This allows him to bluff his way into the position and the Park family’s house.

Parasite Movie: Review

The opening scene of Parasite, which shows a little glass window looking up from a subterranean residence to the view of a narrow winding road, immediately establishes the movie’s visual style. Numerous such shots of this type metaphorically depict the social and economic inequality that serves as this movie’s main theme. In particular, the use of stairways for ascent and descent, confined areas as opposed to large, broad green lawns, and exquisitely and delicately arranged fruit slices as compared to a clumsily heaped plate of food from a nearby restaurant.

Parasite‘ is remarkably well-paced and edited (by Yang Jin-mo), with no superfluous moments. As the plot shifts from one point to another, director Bong Jon-ho expertly crafts stylized, dramatic passages matched to a fantastic background score (Jung Jae-il). It produces a riveting watch. The entire cast gives excellent performances.

Conclusion

Parasite‘ is a wonderfully made movie that is unquestionably a must-see, with an intelligent and piercing investigation of human behavior.

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Parasite Movie Review: Social Satire that Captures the Attention of the AudienceIt's best to go into South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's critically acclaimed box office smash with as little background knowledge as possible. It might be easier to stop and go directly to the theatre if you're reading this before watching the movie and you've...