facebook

The Van der Waals Ferrofluid Speaker Acts Like Winamp Player Visualizations on Steroids

Many people used software called winamp to listen to MP3s years before the iPod was even invented. It was basic and free, but most people used it for the visualizers, which made intricate, psychedelic animations that matched the music. The Van der Waals ferrofluid speaker now makes sound a multi-sensory experience.

Van der Waals Ferrofluid Speaker

The Van der Waals is an orb-shaped audio-visual unit with two different hemispheres—a speaker unit on the rear and a transparent cage with ferrofluid hanging within on the front. The vibrations stir the inky ferrofluid as the music plays, producing a captivating auditory show. The ferrofluid varies based on the waveform’s current EQ depiction.

What is Ferrofluid?

NASA created the ferrofluid to move fuel into rocket engines without gravity. It didn’t quite work out for that reason, but it did look good and serve other purposes. It can be used as a ball-bearing lubricant, a speaker damper, or a hard drive sealer.

The ferrofluid, a viscous black glob, combines a magnetic substance, such as small iron filings, with a liquid combination that keeps the particles from adhering together. The ferrofluid flows like a liquid, but it also reacts to magnetic fields, allowing it to be manipulated and animated without physical contact.

Van der Waals Ferrofluid Speaker Details

It is easy to forget that the Van der Waals is also a speaker, especially in its ferrofluid chamber. It’s encased in a sleek, transparent globe. At the bottom of the Orb-shaped ferrofluid speaker, the unit is a passive radiator and four audio drivers. They combine to provide powerful basses, lush mids, and sharp highs. A specialized electromagnet agitates the ferrofluid on the front, causing it to match the type of music.

The Van der Waals works like any other bluetooth speaker, but with a twist. Users may connect their devices through Bluetooth 5.1 or use the aux input to connect the speaker to a playback device. There’s also an aux input for connecting more Van der Waals and a USB-C port to charge the ferrofluid speaker. The speaker’s controls, which include power and Bluetooth buttons and volume controls and play-pause buttons, are housed in a matte metallic rim surrounding the speaker. The Van der Waals, however, isn’t a smart speaker.

The Van der Waals sound-reactive bluetooth speaker is vast, with a diameter of 9.8 inches and 11 pounds (5 kilos). Thanks to its larger-than-life presence, its compelling aura makes it an excellent accent piece for coffee tables, TV sets, or workstations. Furthermore, it has an LED backlight embedded within the ferrofluid chamber.

Until January 7th, 2022, the ferrofluid speaker was available on Kickstarter. The early bird price was $399, but once those slots were filled, the price increased to $449.

Conclusion

Thanks to fluid control algorithms, users may be immersed in a stunning visual spectacle that adjusts to their musical tastes. The liquid itself may be viewed from near and far, and the visualization adapts according to the overall frequencies and music volume like the winamp visualizer.

Latest Post

--Advertisment--

Similar Prodcuts

Related post

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here